Does it matter where BW is developed?

Discussion in 'Black and White Film Discussion' started by Cerita, Aug 6, 2017.

  1. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    I am now down to 5 more shots of my first ever roll in 30+ years, I am excited to see what I get but mildly terrified too. On the one hand I want to just drop off the roll at one of the last consumer photo shops in town that develops film, and on the other I want to drop it off at one of the last pro places in town, I am leaning towards the pro place. However, does it matter where one drops off for BW developing?
     
  2. 480sparky

    480sparky FF Regular

    43
    Nov 20, 2015
    Ken
    If you want cookie-cutter developing, then drop it off anywhere. The 'pro place' will probably replace exhausted chemicals when they should be while the low-price leaders may not.

    But given there's a near infinite different ways to actually develop b&w film, you'll get far better results if you do it yourself.
     
  3. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    Yes, eventually I will do my own development (I can see my husband cringing LOL), I have been looking into it and I also love having the control over that process. For this roll, I will take it to the Pro shop, they are well known and well respected among the local photographers.
     
  4. I wouldn't skimp on the first roll, go with the pro lab. If something doesn't look right with the pictures, you'll have less reason to suspect the processing.
     
  5. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    Totally agree, and the price difference is like two bucks!
     
  6. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    Ok, I am a idiot LOL! So this roll of BW I am speaking of is Arista Edu 100, and the camera I am using the Minolta Dynax 404si, but I had not idea I had to set the film speed as Arista is not DX coded :(, so the whole roll was shot as what I guess the camera defaults to which is 400. Ha! Ha! Ha! I guess I have got a very undersposed (or overexposed? not sure what happens) roll. Not sure if I should scrap it or take it the lab, any advice? I am not disappointed just feel like a bit of an idiot, and no where does it say on the box or maybe I am just supposed to know :)
     
  7. Don't feel too bad, it's not like you're the first person to do this! Tell the lab that you think you underexposed the film by 2 stops. They should be able to help you out. Some people do this on purpose, it's called "pushing" the film.
     
  8. I meant to add, and I don't want to sound like a smart..., but often the name of the film, in this case Arista EDU 100, will give you a clue as to the ISO/ASA.
     
  9. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    Thank you so much! So, I am right, it's now underexposed? I will tell the lab, and let's hope they can develop for "+ 2 pushed" film. Thanks again! Mostly these cheap Minolta auto cameras read the film speed as I believe there is that code on the cartridge, so I just assumed LOL. Anyhow, live and learn. Thanks again.
     
  10. Jim

    Jim FF Regular

    54
    Apr 2, 2017
    Newark, DE
    As an expert in dumb moves, I will say that you're in good company. The suggestion about a pro lab is a good one; they should be able to compensate for a 2-stop push. Developing film yourself gives you a great deal of control over these issues. It's not too hard, just pick a developer (HC110 might be a good one to start, because it lasts so long.) Bookmark "the Massive Development Chart" - it will have times for various films and various developers. It also have a handy temperature conversion chart if you can't get your processing done at exactly 20C.

    For you husband, tell him that developing yourself costs about half or so what a lab charges, so you're being thrifty!
     
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  11. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    Thank you so much! I will take it in and share the results on the forum. The reason my husband will cringe is I have a number of hobbies, I am machine knitter, I sew my own clothes, I weave and embroider too! Hey, I keep busy in my life and I am never bored! Photography is special though, and I have always loved it since I was a child, especially BW photographs as they just draw me in. I am fortunate to work in a University that has a lovely Archivist who allows me to view BWs photographs from far back as 1902 and before, and sometimes when she has time, I even get to view the deguerrotypes!! Now this is a treat! :).
     
  12. kennethcooke

    kennethcooke FF Veteran

    276
    May 30, 2017
    Leeds, WestRiding, UK
    By and large, I would say, no. B&W development is so easy that most camera shops have access to labs that will do a good job. They normally have to send it away as hour print shops only have access to colour development facilities at which they can process C41 film but pure B&W has to be processed with B&W chemicals, but, why not do it yourself? If you can make a decent cup of coffee you will certainly be able to soup a film, and the personal satisfaction that processing gives you is worth every penny it costs.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. derelict

    derelict FF Rookie

    20
    Jan 27, 2017
    I have outside labs do all of my developing. For B&W, I send it off to the Darkroom Lab. For color, I have a local camera shop who does C41 every two days. Just tell them to push the film 2 stops. Arista, in my experience, does not push too well so youll get heavy grain and more contrast. Should still make for interesting shots.

    I know that I could do it at home and probably save some money but I have elected not to. Why? Silver. A byproduct of developing film that I do not feel is proper to merely wash down the drain. Bigger labs will have a silver recovery/ filter system to reduce the amount of it that is flushed into the water supply. Home developing also wastes a TON of water whereas dedicated labs will have systems where the water will be used more efficiently due to batch sizes.
     
  14. kennethcooke

    kennethcooke FF Veteran

    276
    May 30, 2017
    Leeds, WestRiding, UK
    Fine
     
  15. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    Thanks. I am looking forward to the results, as you say, the shots might be interesting. I am now about to use another cheap film, Kentmere 100 but this time I made sure I have the ISO set properly LOL! Even though I noticed the Kentmere cartridge is coded. What is the best 100-200 BW film available these days?
     
  16. kennethcooke

    kennethcooke FF Veteran

    276
    May 30, 2017
    Leeds, WestRiding, UK
    I would say that FP4 125asa and HP5 400asa are as good as any, also Rollei Retro 100asa is good
     
  17. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    Thanks you for these suggestions, I shall look out for them.
     
  18. 480sparky

    480sparky FF Regular

    43
    Nov 20, 2015
    Ken
    There is no such thing.

    There's 'better' films than others, but they cost more. A Ferrari might be 'better' than a Kia, but if you can't afford a Ferrari, then it doesn't matter how good it is.
     
  19. Cerita

    Cerita FF Regular

    71
    Jul 24, 2017
    Toronto, Canada
    True enough, a bit silly question I suppose :).
     
  20. kennethcooke

    kennethcooke FF Veteran

    276
    May 30, 2017
    Leeds, WestRiding, UK